IU East students create over 200 ceramic bowls for Empty Bowls Luncheon Nov. 15

November 12th, 2014

Call them messages in a soup bowl.

Students have been creating unique ceramic bowls by the dozens in the studio at Indiana University East.

Hour by hour, over 200 pottery pieces have been thrown on the pottery wheel, fired, glazed and fired again.The last kiln was unloaded today (November 12) and now, the colorful finished products sit on shelves, awaiting a special IU East-sponsored luncheon event that will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, November 15. The luncheon will be held at First Friends Meeting in Boruk Hall, located at 2010 Chester Blvd. in Richmond.

IU East student Tristan May, a general studies major, creates a ceramic bowl for the upcoming Empty Bowls Luncheon Nov. 15.

IU East student Tristan May, a general studies major, creates a ceramic bowl for the upcoming Empty Bowls Luncheon Nov. 15.

“I threw 30 bowls,” says Arianna Cook, a senior fine arts major from Cambridge City. “A lot of work goes into it.”

A lot of caring is going into them, too. That’s because the handmade works will serve as the dinnerware for the Empty Bowls Luncheon that is designed to bring attention to world and local hunger. “It’s nice to use art to give back, to help others,” Cook says. “I’ll be there.”

So will Piedad Llerena. In fact, the native of Ecuador wouldn’t miss it for the world.

The message isn’t the meal, she said. “The bowl will go into homes and be a reminder that many people have nothing to eat.”

Llerena has produced 43 reminders in a variety of colors and stripes.

“It’s something I can build with my hands to help others,” Llerena said, a real-estate agent and soon-to-be graduate in business from IU East.

For a $10 donation, luncheon guests can choose their bowl and have it filled with soup. The meal also includes bread, a drink and a dessert. When guests are finished eating, their bowls are washed and returned to them to take home as a reminder that someone’s bowl is always empty.

“At the entrance to the event, tables will be filled with a beautiful display of handmade bowls. It’s fun to watch guests select a bowl that best suits their tastes,” Assistant Professor of Fine Arts Carrie Longley said. Longley has dreamed of putting on the event here for several years. “They make a personal connection.”

That’s the point. Empty Bowls is an international effort.

She became familiar with the program effort through ceramics professor Scott Dooley at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio. “It was such a meaningful event at Wittenberg,” Longley said. “This definitely will be the first of an annual event.”

She believes there will be about 250 bowls available this year. Most have been produced by students, but some have been donated by local potters, including Brian Haviland, Ann Tobin, and Elisha Frazier of Elm Tree Pottery.

Event proceeds will go to Open Arms Ministries, a coalition of 14 churches and social ministries that serves as a clearinghouse of services for low-income families in Richmond and the immediate area. “We take care of needs of people on the edge,” said Lincoln Blake, vice president of Open Arms.

The coalition had been seeking a major fund-raiser. “Nothing seemed to fit,” Blake said. “But, this is the right connect. We’re delighted.”

He and Longley hope the program continues. Early indications are that it will.

Members from the 14 congregations are making the soups, breads, pies and cakes. Three restaurants – Arby’s, Chipotle and Taco Bell – have provided cups, plates and plastic ware, Blake said.

The effort has drawn attention from social media. That resulted Friday in the delivery of four boxes of Square Donuts as students gathered along with Longley to finish up some of their works during the Glaze-A-Thon, which also brought faculty, staff and students to the art studio to help glaze the ceramic bowls.

“We have had an amazing response from campus,” said Ann Tobin, community liaison for the IU East Service-Learning Campus. “We are so thankful.”

Student Government Association members and 21st-Century Scholars have offered help, along with the service-learning club. All of the student artists are donating their time.

“It’s been a lot of fun, but there’s also been a lot of hard work by those making the bowls and those making all the food,” says Tobin, who was familiar with an Empty Bowls program that’s run at Miami University (Ohio), where her husband is a ceramics professor. “It’s a grassroots movement that’s exploded all over.”

Tobin and Longley echo that belief the event has taken wings because it’s such a good cause and the bowls offer a message that can live on.

Hopefully, the bowls will outlive world hunger, too.

For more information about the Empty Bowls Luncheon, contact IU East Assistant Professor of Fine Arts Carrie Longley, at (765) 973-8296 or clongley@iue.edu.

Entries accepted for Whitewater Valley Annual Art Competition

October 2nd, 2014

Indiana University East is accepting art entries October 6-10 for the 2014 Whitewater Valley Annual Art Competition (WVAAC). The competition will begin at 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 18, in Whitewater Hall. Prior to the judging, there will be a juror presentation at 11:30 a.m. in Tom Raper Hall, room 124.

David Klamen

The top ten entries will receive a monetary award. Artists with accepted entries will be notified by Wednesday, October 22.

This year’s competition will be juried by David Klamen, the Chancellor’s Professor of Fine Arts at Indiana University Northwest. Klamen is a contemporary painter whose work grows in conjunction with his interest in literature and philosophy, centralized around visual explorations of the questions, “How do I know things?” and “How do I know myself?”

Klamen paints figuratively and abstractly, sometimes combining the two by incorporating geometric lines or patterns atop his high finished landscapes.

Klamen’s work is meditative and quiet, engaging the audience with deep tonal values and extreme control, requiring the viewer to look more than once into the complexity of each work. In Klamen’s most recent series, Paintings of Paintings, he isolated individual works of art in situ in museums, turned them on sharp angles and repainted them. He is represented in a number of public collections including: the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, the Elvehjem Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin and the McNay Museum, San Antonio.

Klamen earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in 1983 and his Master of Fine Arts in Painting at the School of the Art Institute in 1985. He lives and works in Chicago.

The WVAAC receives 300 to 400 pieces of art for the competition each year. Previous entries have included works from high schools and universities, art organizations and centers and independent artists. The competition is open to all artists, age 17 and older, who live within a 300-mile radius of Richmond, Ind.

Entries for the competition may include drawings, paintings, mixed media, photography, printmaking, computer graphics, relief sculpture and sculpture. Entries must be hand-delivered to The Gallery, Whitewater Hall, on the IU East campus between noon and 5 p.m., Monday, October 6, through Friday, October 10. Entries will not be accepted after October 10.

Each artist may submit up to three entries. Fees are $25 for one entry, $30 for two entries, and $40 for three entries.

Accepted entries will be on exhibit in The Gallery from November 6 to January 16. The artist opening reception and awards presentation will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 6, in Whitewater Hall.

Entry forms, information on eligibility and a calendar are available at iue.edu/gallery or by calling Ed Thornburg, The Gallery curator, at IU East at (765) 973-8605.

Hispanic Heritage Month: Campus & Community Events

September 19th, 2014

Indiana University East will present Alice Driver from 5-6 p.m. on Monday, September 22, in the Whitewater Hall Community Room. Driver, a photojournalist in Mexico, will present on her upcoming book More or Less Dead. She will also talk about her work as a photographer and as a documentary filmmaker. Her documentary film is If Images Could Fill Our Empty Spaces.
The event is free and open to the public. The presentation is a part of Hispanic Heritage Month events at IU East. The event is sponsored by Mindful Explorations, courtesy of the William H. and Jean R. Reller Endowment, IU East Diversity grant, and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Driver will discuss issues related to border cities between Mexico and the United States including women’s issues, policing, violence, diversity, and culture. Driver researched these issues while a postdoctoral fellow at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico City where she worked with the Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte.

Driver received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Studies from the University of Kentucky. Her writing has been featured in publications such as Al Jazeera, Ms. Magazine, Women’s Media Center, Salon, and Vela, and her photography has appeared in National Geographic. She is currently a consultant at the Inter-American Development Bank where she serves as a writer for the United Nations sponsored project Sustainable Energy for All.

She will visit classes and talk with faculty and staff while at IU East September 22-23.  She will also appear live on WETV Channel 20 at 11 a.m. on Monday, September 22.

IU East’s Hispanic Heritage Month celebration is September 13 to October 12 with several events and activities offered by the World Languages and Cultures department and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Throughout the month WCTV will air the “Let’s Talk” discussion on Hispanic Health. The discussion covers common health issues and obstacles experienced by Hispanics in Richmond as well as provides information about local resources available to help overcome health related barriers. The “Let’s Talk” series includes a comprehensive presentation by IU East faculty and leaders in the community.

IU East Spanish students are visiting Richmond elementary schools for Huevos verdes y jamon (Bilingual Storytelling) September 16-18 as part of a joint venture with the Campus Library and literacy movements. Students read books to the elementary students and speak about Hispanic Heritage Month.

The storytelling program is in its third year. The Campus Library purchases books and packets for IU East students to work with the elementary school students. The students also examine works by Xavier Garza, children’s author and illustrator. Garza will visit IU East to speak with students about his writing on Monday, October 13, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., in the Whitewater Hall Community Room.

On Thursday, October 9, Spanish classes at IU East will create altars for Day of the Dead. Members of the campus are invited to contribute photos of loved ones. The classes will present their altars and speak about Day of the Dead via the Hispanicampus gallery project. The campus will vote for their favorite altar. The event begins at 1:30 p.m. in the Campus Library, located in Hayes Hall.
List of Hispanic Heritage Month Events at IU East

  • Room 912 Exhibit: IU East students who studied abroad in Argentina exhibit their artwork and research projects at IU East’s Room 912, located at 912 E. Main Street in Richmond, Ind., September 13-October 15
  • Hispanic Campus: Virtual Galleries feature Room 912 exhibit and Day of the Dead Altars, September 13-October 15
  • Huevos verdes y jamon (Bilingual Storytelling): IU East students visit Fairview Elementary School and Elizabeth Starr Academy, September 16-September 18
  • Alice Driver Visit: Alice Driver campus presentation, Whitewater Hall Community Room, 5-6 p.m., Monday, September 22
  • Day of the Dead Altar Building Competition: IU East Spanish classes create altars for Day of the Dead, Hayes Hall Campus Library Atrium, 1:30 p.m., Thursday, October 9
  • Xavier Garza Visit: Xavier Garza, children’s author and illustrator, will visit IU East to speak with students about his writing, 11:15-12:15 a.m., Whitewater Hall Community Room, Monday, October 13

New HSS Faculty

September 16th, 2014

Indiana University East is pleased to welcome its newest faculty in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Melissa Blankenship

Melissa Blankenship

 

Melissa Blankenship, visiting lecturer in English, received her Master of Fine Arts in Creative Non-Fiction from Murray State University and her Bachelor of Fine Arts in English with a Creative Writing minor from Indiana University East.

Previously, Blankenship was a teaching assistant and an adjunct instructor of English at IU East. She was also an instructor of English at Ivy Tech Community College. As an undergraduate, Blankenship was part of the IU East Honors Program and was named the 2008 IU East Naomi Osborne Scholar, awarded to the graduating senior with the highest grade point average, and she graduated with Highest Distinction. In 2007, she received a Summer Research Scholarship.

Blankenship has most recently published articles in Pressing News, Pressing Irons and Trivet Collectors of America, and The Trivet Collectors Network. She has presented at the Northeast Popular Culture Association Conference, and the 19th Undergraduate Intercampus Women’s/Gender Studies Conference.

 

Shay Clamme

Shay Clamme

 

Shay Clamme, lecturer in criminal justice, received her Master of Public Administration with a Concentration in Criminal Justice and Criminology and her Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies with a Minor in Political Science and Criminal Justice from Ball State University.

Prior to joining IU East, Clamme was a program assistant at Indiana Wesleyan University. Formerly, she was a college program advisor and an instructor at Harrison College. She has also been an instructor at Ivy Tech Community College in Marion, Ind.

 

 

 

Greg Dam

Greg Dam

 

Gregory Dam, lecturer in psychology, received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Northwestern University where he also completed his Master of Arts in Learning Sciences and a Graduate Specialization in Cognitive Science. He received his Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Sacred Heart University, located in Fairfield, Conn.

Previoulsy, Dam was an adjunct instructor at Ohio Dominican University. Formerly, he worked at the University of Rio Grande as a psychology instructor, an NIH IRACDA Postdoctoral Fellow and a psychology instructor at Northeastern Illinois University.

He has published articles in PLoS One, Cognitive Science, Complexity, and Behavior Research Methods. He has presented at national conferences including the American Psychology Association Annual Convention most recently. His research interests are learning in biological and artificial systems.

 

Amanda Kraha

Amanda Kraha

 

Amanda Kraha, lecturer in psychology, received her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of North Texas and her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology from Arkansas Tech University.

Previously, Kraha was a visiting lecturer at the University of Houston-Clear Lake. Formerly, she was a research consultant at the University of North Texas in the College of Information. She also worked as a research analyst for Elite Research, LLC, in Carrollton, Texas, and as a research participation pool coordinator for the University of North Texas Department of Psychology.

She has published articles in several publications including New School Psychology Bulletin, Memory, Stress and Health, Frontiers in Psychology, and a chapter in the book Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment. She has presented her papers at national and international conferences, including at the American Psychological Association.

In 2012, Kraha received an Academic Research Grant from Lafayette College and a Small Grant Program and Graduate Student Research Support and Fellowship Program awards in 2011 from the University of North Texas.

 

Eevett Loshek

Eevett Loshek

 

Eevett Loshek, lecturer in psychology, received her Master in Arts in Experimental Psychology from the University of North Dakota and her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Anthropology from the University of Wisconsin LaCrosse. She received her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the University of North Dakota.
Previously, Loshek was an instructor and a lab instructor at the University of North Dakota while completing her doctorate degree.

Loshek’s research interests include women’s sexual assertiveness as it relates to gender and aging, attitudes on homophobia, and evolutionary psychology related to gender and feminism. She has published an article in Behavior Analyst Today and recently had an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Sex Research. She has had poster presentations at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Conference, Midwestern Psychological Association Conference, and the Northern Lights Conference.

She is a current member of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology and the American Psychology Association.

 

Katherine Miller

Katherine Miller

 

Katherine Miller, assistant professor of anthropology, received her Master of Arts in Anthropology from Arizona State University and her Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology and a Minor in Religious Studies from Indiana University. She is a candidate for her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Arizona State University. Previously, Miller was a visiting lecturer at Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Honduras. Formerly, she was adjunct instructor at Kingsborough Community College, an instructor at Arizona State University, and an adjunct instructor at Mesa Community College.

Miller’s research interests include social organization, kinship, identity, household archaeology, human osteology, odontometry, biogeochemistry, cultural body modifications and Mesoamerican bioarchaeology.

Most recently, she received a Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant from the National Science Foundation for 2012-2014, among several other travel and research grants, honors and awards.

She has published an article in Yearbook Journal of Anthropological Archeology as well as manuscripts in American Anthropologist and the Journal of Anthropological Archeology.

Miller has presented at conferences nationally including the Annual American Anthropological Association Meeting and lectured nationally and internationally at universities and conferences. She is a current member of the American Association of Physical Anthropology, American Association of Anthropologists, American Chemical Society and the Society of America Archeology.

IU East students to exhibit artwork, research from Argentina study abroad trip

September 8th, 2014

RICHMOND, Ind. – Indiana University East students who studied abroad in Argentina this past May as part of a civilization and culture online course will exhibit their projects at the university’s Room 912, located at 912 E. Main Street in Richmond, Ind. The exhibit will be on display from September 13 to October 15 as part of Hispanic Heritage Month.

IU East students traveled to Argentina as part of a civilization and culture online course in May. The students will display their artwork and research projects at IU East’s Room 912 Sept. 12-Oct. 15.

Twelve students visited cities including metropolitan Buenos Aires and went horseback riding on a gaucho farm. The students toured the subtropical rain forest of Iguazú. All students completed a research project while there, May 17-24.

Dianne Moneypenny, assistant professor of World Languages and Cultures at IU East, said the students will present their artwork and research from the trip to the community. She said students chose an area of research and then visualized this research with a fine arts piece instead of a traditional paper. The exhibit includes pottery, installation pieces, paintings, sculpture, and more.

Moneypenny said study abroad opportunities are important for students.

“The student feedback on the trip was fantastic. The trip enhanced their classroom learning; in fact the experiences on the ground far surpassed anything I could have attempted in the classroom,” Moneypenny said.

She mentioned that some of the students had never flown, never left the country, and had never been in a taxi before the study abroad course.

“Many now feel confident traveling abroad on their own and, by the end of the trip, some even considered seeking employment internationally after graduation. That simply would not have even been on their radar before having this experience. It was so rewarding to witness as an educator,” Moneypenny said.

Jennifer Perkins, a student at IU East completing her communications degree online, said she wanted to go on this trip to help her understand another culture. As a high school student, Perkins had traveled to England while studying British literature and found the experience beneficial to be immersed in the culture she learned about.

“The trip to Argentina allowed me to use knowledge I have gained from numerous classes while enrolled at IU East. Not only was I able to see and respect the history and the land from the course connected to the trip, but I also practiced my Spanish from the two semesters I have taken, worked on my nonverbal communication skills when the Spanish failed me, and relied heavily on my cultural communication information,” Perkins said.

Perkins said as a communications major, she focused on nonverbal communication while in Argentina.

“I listened to the rate of speech, looked at how close or far individuals stood from one another in various settings, paid attention to the volume of speech, and noted various gestures,” Perkins said.

Teddy Criswell of New Castle, Ind., said he wanted to go on the trip to improve his Spanish. He has taken the foreign language course in high school and college, but wanted to experience speaking and hearing Spanish in everyday life. Also, he said he is a vivid outdoorsman and he wanted to visit the wingshooting capital of the world, Argentina.

While in Argentina, Criswell studied the country’s law enforcement.

“My project is about the presence of law enforcement in Argentina. I looked at the cops and how they are different and similar to ours here in the USA. The reason I chose this was because I am a criminal justice major and it fit in well with what I am studying,” Criswell said.

In Argentina, students toured Buenos Aires including the Plaza de Mayo, home to Casa Rosada, the Metropolitan Cathedral, where Pope Frances practiced as well as his modest apartment building located next door, toured Eva Peron’s grave and took a Tigre River delta cruise. They attended a Tango show to learn the history of the dance and took Tango lessons.

In Iguazú the class group went to a rain forest animal rehabilitation center and to the point where Paraguay, Brazil, and Argentina meet.

“We hiked 10 miles through the rain forest to Iguazú falls, the widest waterfalls in the world. We even did a boat ride that showered us with the falls’ water! Ponchos were for naught,” Moneypenny said. “The students loved the food, particularly the steak. At the gaucho meal, we received five different meats: sausage, blood sausage, chicken, thin steak, and an inch thick steak. We wondered when the meats would end.”

Moneypenny said the travel course was possible because of the support received from the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, the International Studies Committee including Executive Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs Larry Richards, Vice Chancellor of Administration and Finance Dan Dooley, Interim Dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences Ross Alexander, Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships Sarah Soper, Star Johnson in the Office of Administration and Finance, and scholarships from Robert Starr Jordan and Eleanor Turk.