University Police

Safety at IU East

Reporting a Crime

Indiana University East provides several ways in which to report a crime or problem. All persons can report a crime directly to the IUEPD at 973-8429. You may contact the operator who will notify an Officer to meet with you. You may also email the IUEPD with information regarding a crime and be contacted if you request. All crimes in progress, suspicious persons to safety matters should be reported. If the problem is not a public safety matter or within the jurisdiction of the IUEPD, it will be referred to the proper agency. What happened, what to report to IUEPD If you observe a crime in progress or behavior which you suspect is criminal, immediately notify IUEPD. Report as much information as possible.

  1. Activity
  2. Person's description: height, weight, sex, clothing, weapons
  3. Location
  4. Direction of Travel
  5. Vehicle CYMBALL
    • Color (eg. black over red)
    • Year (eg. late model 2007)
    • Make (eg. Ford, Dodge, etc)
    • Body (eg. 2 door, 4 door)
    • And
    • License (eg. 89 Z1234 or personalized plate)
    • Location (eg. Whitewater lot)

Do NOT approach or attempt to apprehend the person(s) involved

Stay on the telephone with the Police/operator and provide additional information as changes in the situation occurs, until the first police officer arrives.

Emergencies

An emergency is defined as: adj: made necessary by sudden occurrences demanding immediate remedy. A sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate action.

Emergencies that may occur at IU East may be medical, weather, criminal activity or traffic related problems. Officers are equipped and trained to handle emergency situations. Officers have contact with other local police agencies, fire and ambulance units.

To report an emergency you may do so by contacting the IUEPD office at ext. 429 or the campus operator at 973-8200 or ext 0 on a campus phone. You may also reach the officers by cell phone at 960-6803.

For assistance on the parking lots, use the call boxes.

Call Boxes

Emergency call boxes are located in each parking lot. They are identified by a blue light which burns continuously directly above the call box. The boxes are to be used for emergency or general assistance from the IUEPD.

To operate the call box: Easy to follow directions are on each box. When the call box button is pressed, an automatic "Call for Assistance" message is transmitted to the IUEPD radios. Additional information may then be given via the call box. Requests for assistance such as vehicle trouble, suspicious person or vehicle, may also be relayed on the call box.

Remain at the call box until the officer arrives unless there is an emergency that requires you to leave the area.

Call boxes are monitored during normal business hours by the IUEPD.

Police Assistance - After Hours

Many persons use the IU East campus after normal business hours, to do work or for recreation, walking, and jogging.

If you need emergency Police assistance after hours, and are using a campus phone you will need to dial 9-9-1-1 to reach the Wayne County Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The dispatcher will then assist you in your need. An IUEPD officer will then be contacted.

For Non-emergency requests you may contact the following agencies.

  • Richmond Police Department: 765-983-7247
  • Wayne County Sheriff's Office: 765-973-9393
  • Indiana State Police: 765-966-6741

Protective Orders

Indiana Code (34-26-5-1) establishes the basis for protective orders in Indiana. Protective orders are construed to promote the:

  • protection and safety of all victims of domestic or family violence in a fair, prompt, and effective manner; and
  • prevention of future domestic and family violence. All emergency and protective orders are to be on file with the IUEPD, who actively enforces these court orders. This will ensure that all persons have a safe environment in which to work and learn.

Weapons Possession on Campus

The unapproved possession, use or sale of firearms, ammunition, fireworks, major or minor explosives or any lethal weapons on the IU East campus is forbidden and subject to university discipline as well as criminal sanctions. Handgun permits issued by the State of Indiana are not valid on IU properties.

Alcohol / Drugs on Campus

Indiana University East complies with federal, state, and local laws, including those, which regulate the possession, use and sale of alcoholic beverages and controlled substances. Under the drug and alcohol policies of IU East, the following behavior is prohibited on the IU East campus and at university sponsored activities:

  • Use or possession of alcoholic beverages on university property or in the course of a university activity or student organization activity, unless specifically approved for such purpose by the Chancellor of this campus.
  • Providing alcoholic beverages to individuals under 21 years of age or possession of alcoholic beverages by individuals under 21 years of age.
  • Use or possession of any drug or controlled substance, or of drug paraphernalia, on university property or in the course of a university activity or student organization activity contrary to law.
  • Use of university facilities to manufacture, possess or distribute any drug or controlled substance contrary to law.

The Student Code of Ethics Handbook details offenses and disciplinary policies for students. Sanctions under university procedures include probation, suspension and dismissal from the institution.

Indiana University East also assists its members in finding alternatives to alcohol and drug use for social interaction and stress reduction. Indiana University East offers, through the Center for Health Promotion, individual assessment and referral to resources on and off campus. In addition to these services, psychological and domestic counseling and referral is offered. For more information read about student assistance.

Biological-Chemical Incident-Terrorism

The IU East Police Department is trained and equipped to handle these types of incidents. In the event that you are exposed or have contact with an unknown substance, which may be hazardous, or (life threatening) you must follow the Center for Disease Control (CDC) procedures.

The U.S. Postal Service and the FBI have also approved the following procedures. Substances may be solids, liquids or gas, i.e. dust, powder, vapors, etc.

  • Do not shake or empty the contents of the letter or container.
  • Cover the items with any available materials: cloth, paper, trash can, etc.
  • All persons must leave the room immediately Close all doors and seal the room.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Contact the IU East Police Department who will determine the appropriate follow-up action.

Silent Witness Program

Indiana University East allows anonymous reporting of crimes at the Silent Witness webiste. All information will be kept confidential.

Children on Campus

A parent or guardian must supervise children under the age of twelve at all times. Children are not permitted to use any equipment on the IU East campus, this includes the use of computers and computer labs. Children are not permitted to use skateboards, roller blades or scooters on IU property at any time.

Bicycles cannot be ridden on sidewalks, bicycles must be parked in approved racks only, do not chain bicycles to any object or building. Violators are subject to arrest and disciplinary action for any violation.

Pets on Campus

Pets are not permitted on campus. Service animals trained to aid as help dogs for persons with disabilities are permitted on campus. Persons should not leave animals in vehicles unattended while on campus.

Responding to an Active Shooter

What is an active shooter?

An active shooter is a person who appears to be actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a populated area — typically employing the use of firearms. In some cases active shooters use other weapons and/or improvised explosive devices (IED) to cause additional victimization and act as an impediment to law enforcement and emergency services responders. There may be no pattern or method to their selection of victims.

These situations are dynamic and evolve rapidly, demanding immediate deployment of law enforcement resources to stop the shooting and mitigate harm to innocent victims.

Hostage or barricaded subject situations often take place over a longer period of time and usually there is no ongoing injury or loss of life. These situations are often managed through the deployment of specialized units, as time allows. Both hostage and barricaded subject situations can rapidly shift to Active Shooter situations and vice versa.

What do I do in an active shooter situation?

  1. Run
    If a safe path is available, run. Always try and escape or evacuate even if others insist on staying.  Encourage others to leave with you but don't let the indecision of others slow down your own effort to escape. Once you are out of the line of fire, try to prevent others from walking into the danger zone and call 9-1-1

  2. Hide
    If you can't get out safely, find a place to hide. When hiding, turn out lights, remember to lock doors and silence your ringer and vibration mode on your cell phone

  3. Fight
    As a last resort, working together or alone, act with aggression, use improvised weapons to disarm the shooter. Commit to taking the shooter down.

University Police - Indiana University East

video image

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=h86rpUm3DA8

This video was created by the City of Houston’s Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security using funds from the Department of Homeland Security. Please be aware that this video is designed to educate the public on surviving an active shooter event. The video contains graphic images of a violent shooter situation.

Training

The Department of Homeland Security announces the availability of a new, no-cost Independent Study Course developed to provide the public with guidance on how to prepare for and respond to active shooter crisis situations.
Read more in the Blog
.

8 Signs of Terrorism
The Indiana Intelligence Fusion Center maintains a document which outlines ways that may help detect potential terrorist acts. Indicators of a potential event may occur weeks, months or even years apart. Documenting details of events or behaviors witnessed is important, no matter how small or insignificant they may seem. 

Read 8 Signs of Terrorism

What to expect from responding police officers?

Police officers responding to an active shooter are trained to proceed immediately to the area in which shots were last heard; their purpose is to stop the shooting as quickly as possible. They may be dressed in regular patrol uniforms, or they may be wearing external bulletproof vests, Kevlar helmets, and other tactical equipment. The officers may be armed with rifles, shotguns, or handguns, and might be using pepper spray or tear gas to control the situation.

Remain calm, do as the officers tell you, and do not be afraid of them. Put down any bags or packages you may be carrying and keep your hands visible at all times; if you know where the shooter is, tell the officers.

The first officers to arrive will not stop to aid injured people; rescue teams composed of other officers and emergency medical personnel will follow the first officers into secured areas to treat and remove injured persons. Keep in mind that even once you have escaped to a safer location, the entire area is still a crime scene; police will usually not let anyone leave until the situation is fully under control and all witnesses have been identified and questioned. Until you are released, remain at whatever assembly point authorities designate.

 

Guidance to faculty, staff, and students

In general, how you respond to an active shooter will be dictated by the specific circumstances of the encounter, bearing in mind there could be more than one shooter involved in the same situation. If you find yourself involved in an active shooter situation, try to remain calm and use these guidelines to help you plan a strategy for survival.

If an active shooter is outside your building

Proceed to a room that can be locked, close and lock all the windows and doors, and turn off all the lights; if possible, get everyone down on the floor and ensure that no one is visible from outside the room. One person in the room should call 911, advise the dispatcher of what is taking place, and inform him/her of your location; remain in place until the police, or a campus administrator known to you, gives the "all clear". Unfamiliar voices may be the shooter attempting to lure victims from their safe space; do not respond to any voice commands until you can verify with certainty that they are being issued by a police officer.

If an active shooter is in the same building you are

Determine if the room you are in can be locked and if so, follow the same procedure described in the previous paragraph. If your room can’t be locked, determine if there is a nearby location that can be reached safely and secured, or if you can safely exit the building. If you decide to move from your current location, be sure to follow the instructions outlined below.

If an active shooter enters your office or classroom

Try to remain calm. Dial 911, if possible, and alert police to the shooter’s location; if you can’t speak, leave the line open so the dispatcher can listen to what’s taking place. Normally the location of a 911 call can be determined without speaking. If there is absolutely no opportunity for escape or hiding, it might be possible to negotiate with the shooter; attempting to overpower the shooter with force should be considered a very last resort, after all other options have been exhausted. If the shooter leaves the area, proceed immediately to a safer place and do not touch anything that was in the vicinity of the shooter.

No matter what the circumstances

If you decide to flee during an active shooting situation, make sure you have an escape route and plan in mind. Do not attempt to carry anything while fleeing; move quickly, keep your hands visible, and follow the instructions of any police officers you may encounter. Do not attempt to remove injured people; instead, leave wounded victims where they are and notify authorities of their location as soon as possible. Do not try to drive off campus until advised it is safe to do so by police or campus administrators.

What to expect from responding police officers

Police officers responding to an active shooter are trained to proceed immediately to the area in which shots were last heard; their purpose is to stop the shooting as quickly as possible. The first responding officers will normally be in teams of four (4); they may be dressed in regular patrol uniforms, or they may be wearing external bulletproof vests, Kevlar helmets, and other tactical equipment. The officers may be armed with rifles, shotguns, or handguns, and might be using pepper spray or tear gas to control the situation. Regardless of how they appear, remain calm, do as the officers tell you, and do not be afraid of them. Put down any bags or packages you may be carrying and keep your hands visible at all times; if you know where the shooter is, tell the officers. The first officers to arrive will not stop to aid injured people; rescue teams composed of other officers and emergency medical personnel will follow the first officers into secured areas to treat and remove injured persons. Keep in mind that even once you have escaped to a safer location, the entire area is still a crime scene; police will usually not let anyone leave until the situation is fully under control and all witnesses have been identified and questioned. Until you are released, remain at whatever assembly point authorities designate.