scholarly resources

scholarly resources

Psychology Questions

Psychology Questions

This week, in our ongoing series on how to do research in the major disciplines at IU East, we will look at psychology.  Psychology courses can have a lot of potential research topics – you might be looking for a theorist, a type of treatment, historical issues in psychology, or approach from a mental health perspective. Most types of psychology research are well supported by the general techniques we explored at the beginning of this series.  Several databases are tailored for this, including PsycINFO and ProQuest Psychology.  If you are interested in a historical topic, a database like JSTOR may also be of value.  All of our other psychology-related databases can be found here. So, for example, if we were … Continued
Starting to Research

Starting to Research

Whether you’ve been a student for a long time or are just getting started, knowing how to do good research can be a challenge.  You’re probably great at finding movie times with Google, browsing Wikipedia for quick information, and maybe you even do your shopping or banking online.  So you know that you’re good with a computer.  But what about the next step?  In your classes, you’re often told that you can only use ‘scholarly’ sources, and professors reject web pages.  How do you distinguish what the scholarly sources are, and where to find them?  And how do you use them? IU East subscribes to a lot of high quality sources that are ideal to use in your academic work.  … Continued
Mental Health Resources

Mental Health Resources

October 6th – 12th is National Mental Health Awareness Week, a yearly effort by the National Alliance on Mental Illness to foster discussion and understanding for people with mental illnesses.  They focus on grassroots efforts and community-level events to spread awareness, and the local NAMI organization has events planned for Richmond. But what if you want to dig deeper?  As always, the library is a great source for high-quality information.  From major databases like ProQuest Psychology and PsycInfo to the National Institute of Health’s PubMed Central, we have a staggering number of articles on mental illness and health.  And if books are more your thing, databases like eBrary contain dozens of titles like: Empowering People with Severe Mental Illness: A … Continued
So, If I Can’t Use Wikipedia, What Do I Use?

So, If I Can’t Use Wikipedia, What Do I Use?

You’ve heard it before – you can’t use Wikipedia for this assignment.  This actually isn’t new – long before Wikipedia was invented, students in past generations were often banned from citing any encyclopedia for some assignments, because professors want students to use more in-depth sources.  But let’s say you really need a comprehensive encyclopedia for your work.  Where do you go?  One great source is the Encyclopedia Britannica Online Academic Edition.  Like the print version, the Britannica is written by a large staff of trained professionals and editors, assuring high-quality coverage of any topic of human thought.  This large staff also means that current events articles are updated within two weeks of the event, so it’s a good source for … Continued
Finding Peer Reviewed Articles

Finding Peer Reviewed Articles

A common question students have is, “How do I tell if an article has been peer-reviewed?”  A peer-reviewed journal is one in which other experts in the field read the articles before they are printed, and verify that the research is sound and that they are suitable for publication. It is a method for improving the reliability and credibility of a journal.  However, it slows down publication – an article might not see print for two years after it’s written, if it undergoes the peer-review process.  So peer-review is great for scholarly research, but poor for news.  That’s why not everything is peer-reviewed.  Many article databases that we subscribe to allow you to filter to just peer-reviewed journals. In the … Continued