literature

literature

English Questions

English Questions

If you’ve been following this blog, you know we’ve been examining how to do in-depth research in each of the major academic disciplines IU East offers.  There’s a lot that is the same for any type of scholarly research, and we started off looking at those general techniques.  But every field of study has its own, unique needs, and to be a great researcher, you need to learn them.  This week, we’ll look at English and literature. Obviously, we have a lot of great general purpose databases for locating research articles – some of these include MLA International Bibliography and ProQuest Language and Literature.  But another great source is JSTOR, a database that has journal articles dating back more than … Continued
Studying the Bard

Studying the Bard

And since you know you cannot see yourself, so well as by reflection, I, your glass, will modestly discover to yourself, that of yourself which you yet know not of. ~ William Shakespeare A bedrock foundation of any literature curriculum is William Shakespeare, who is still considered the greatest English-language author even over 400 years after his birth (the date of which is not known, but generally celebrated on April 23 – also the date of his death).  Shakespeare plays a huge role in the IU East curriculum – and not just in ENG-L 315, Major Plays of Shakespeare.  His work touches literature courses including ENG-L 297, English Literature to 1600, ENG-L 225, Introduction to World Masterpieces, ENG-L 308, Elizabethan … Continued
A Guide to Learning to Like Classic Literature

A Guide to Learning to Like Classic Literature

          Often when we hear the words “classic literature” we think of stories from a past, relatively uneventful, time period. Or we just collectively yawn in response to the thought of literature and zone out. Either way, classic literature sometimes appears uninteresting due to the time period, or just wholly unappealing due to the language used. Therefore, here is a guide to learning to like the classics.             The first thing that you should know on your journey to liking classic literature is that even though you may, at first, see these classics as just old books that used to be important or interesting, these books can still be found deeply interesting and fun to read. But if at this … Continued